Regarding Race, Nation, and Our Future

Written Work by Graham T. Baden

Time Trip — Eugene McDaniels, Spiro Agnew, Pete Rock & CL Smooth, and The Beastie Boys

Eugene McDaniels’s 1972 album “Headless Heroes of the Apocalypse” was banned by then US Vice President Spiro Agnew due to the controversial lyrics contained within the album. But what made … Continue reading

January 22, 2015 · Leave a comment

The British Dialect of Race and Nation: Postcolonial Histories of Sub-Subaltern Societies

The British Dialect of Race and Nation: Postcolonial Histories Of Sub-Subaltern Societies In the 1960s and 70s, waves of resistance swept over an empire upon which the sun had not … Continue reading

January 20, 2015 · Leave a comment

“Our White Fathers:” Patriarchy and Shifting Gender Roles in Colonial Nigeria, 1900-1961

“Our White Fathers:” Patriarchy and Shifting Gender Roles in Colonial Nigeria, 1900-1961             The twentieth-century immigration of European colonizers to Nigeria required the maintenance of a … Continue reading

January 13, 2015 · 3 Comments

Algeria’s Gender Dialectic: Tradition, Autocracy, and the Pursuit of Gender Equality in Algeria, 1954–2014

Algeria’s Gender Diaialectic: Tradition, Autocracy, and the Pursuit of Gender Equality in Algeria, 1954—2014               Algeria, a nation of social contrasts and political contradictions, stands … Continue reading

January 9, 2015 · 1 Comment

Critical Analysis — Three Mothers, Three Daughters: Palestinian Women’s Stories

Away from the streets of Palestine, in the kitchens and salons of Palestinian families, the private lives of Arab women are hidden from the West’s imperial gaze. As interested in … Continue reading

November 10, 2014 · Leave a comment

Think Back Thursday — Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti

Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti was a political activist and a champion of women’s rights in colonial and post-independence Nigeria. She was a leading force in women’s suffrage during the 1950s and she … Continue reading

November 6, 2014 · Leave a comment

A Cover by Any Other Name — Duran Duran, Deftones, Sneaker Pimps, and More…

  Here’s a song that has been covered a dozen times, but just can’t seem to have a bad version made of it. Duran Duran’s “The Chauffeur,” off their second album Rio … Continue reading

August 31, 2014 · Leave a comment

Time Trip — Jefferson Airplane, Tom Scott, and Pete Rock & CL Smooth

I’ve been listening to a lot of Tom Scott recently. It’s been killing me trying to figure out from where I knew the saxophone jam at the end of his … Continue reading

July 23, 2014 · Leave a comment

Covet/Budget — Lusting for Art Deco

        This week, I get to lust after another beautiful pre-war piece. The Sparton Model #557 “Sled” was introduced in 1936 and only manufactured for a year. Its … Continue reading

July 3, 2014 · 4 Comments

The Coldest War: The Fall of Imperialism and the Rise of Neo-Liberalism

History remembers the Cold War as one divided by right and wrong. While it is easier to say that the “West” and the “East” drew a line in the sand … Continue reading

June 19, 2014 · Leave a comment

Benjamin Franklin: Imagining an American Identity

Through the eighteenth century, colonial Americans perceived themselves in ways not dissimilar to their British counterparts. By profession, religion, and class, just as in much of the world, colonists found … Continue reading

June 13, 2014 · 6 Comments

Pan-African, Pan-Cameroonian: The Exceptionalism and Entanglement of Cameroon’s Independence History

    Pan-African, Pan-Cameroonian: The Exceptionalism and Entanglement of Cameroon’s Independence History   The Republic of Cameroon is known affectionately by many names. For geographic reasons, it is known in … Continue reading

June 12, 2014 · 3 Comments

Response — Linda Markert and Biotechnology

I cannot analyze Linda Markert’s position regarding biotechnology, xeno-transplantation, or cloning because, as this text is a chapter from a textbook, she has accordingly hedged her comments and posited a … Continue reading

June 9, 2014 · Leave a comment

Response — Ray Kurtzweil’s Singularity

  Ray Kurzweil is a visionary. From a young age in the 60s, his work has pushed the limits of technological progress, bringing reading to the blind and music to … Continue reading

June 7, 2014 · Leave a comment

New Dog, Old Tricks — Learning About Smoking Pipes

I’ve been posting a lot of pipes on eBay for my dad over the past few weeks. I’ve never really known anything about them (except for how to use them, … Continue reading

June 5, 2014 · Leave a comment

Memorial Day — Forgotten Troops

This is for our forgotten troops, fallen in our wars but missing from our history books. This is for the missing memorials, for the men and women, black, coloured, and asian, … Continue reading

May 26, 2014 · Leave a comment

Happy Cameroon National Day!

A message from Secretary of State John Kerry: “On behalf of President Obama and the American people, I congratulate the people of Cameroon as you celebrate your national day on … Continue reading

May 19, 2014 · Leave a comment

Response — Roy Scranton, “Learning How to Die in the Anthropocene”

Anthropologists and sociologists, historians and philosophers; scholars of all schools and colors have tracked the progress of Human Civilization since its very genesis. From the first use of fire to … Continue reading

May 4, 2014 · Leave a comment

Legislation, Leadership, and Violence: The Politics of Change in a Divided World

hist.396.presentation.LegislationLeadershipandViolence  

April 28, 2014 · Leave a comment

Pan-African, Pan-Cameroonian: The Success, Influence, and Failure of the Union des Populations Camerounais

  Download the PDF here Hist.392.presentation.UPC

April 28, 2014 · Leave a comment

Covet/Budget — This Week’s Wish List

It’s hard not to want to take everything home with you when you work at an antiques store. Walking through the shop, cleaning and helping customers, it’s sometimes all I can … Continue reading

April 24, 2014 · Leave a comment

Film Analysis — The Gods Must Be Crazy

At first glance, “The Gods Must Be Crazy” is an innocent comedy, full of guiltless slapstick and overtly-prolonged gags. Billed as “an epic comedy of absurd proportions,” it has become … Continue reading

April 4, 2014 · 4 Comments

Shaping Power — The Woodworks of the Luba Peoples of Central Africa

The glorious wooden carvings of the Luba peoples hold within them an indefinable power. They held kings, recorded histories, and united nations. While it is easy to grasp why the … Continue reading

March 28, 2014 · Leave a comment

Throwback Thursday — Stephen Bantu Biko

Stephen Bantu Biko, born December 18, 1946 and murdered the 12th of September, 1977 was a champion of Pan-Africa and a hero of the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa during the … Continue reading

March 27, 2014 · Leave a comment

John Naisbitt– “Technology as Currency,” High Tech, High Touch

In “Technology is the Currency of our Lives,” found in High Tech, High Touch, published in 1999, the author John Naisbitt discusses a familiar topic, but it in an interesting … Continue reading

March 21, 2014 · Leave a comment

Presentation– Imagining a Bilingual Nation

Power Point: Imagining a Bilingual Nation PDF: Imagining a Bilingual Nation

March 21, 2014 · Leave a comment

Imagining a Bilingual Nation: A Study of Cameroon’s Independence and Reunification at its Fiftieth Anniversary

Abstract: Considering the unique position of the Cameroons, having had three colonial rulers within the 20th century, what were the political, social, and economic reasons for the unification of Anglophone … Continue reading

March 21, 2014 · 2 Comments

Don’t Listen To Music

School turns people into socialists, they tell me, Don’t go to school. Music makes people rebellious, they say, Don’t listen to music. Don’t read books, Don’t learn. Don’t make too … Continue reading

March 21, 2014 · Leave a comment

Interwar Malaise: A Tragic Fate Long Decided

           While the generations that face the twenty-first century might wish it, history can point to no single cause for the Second World War. Though we might accuse the “War Guilt … Continue reading

March 21, 2014 · 5 Comments

Ruben Um Nyobe

This man is fascinating! I wrote a paper about Cameroonian independence in 2012 (I finally uploaded it) and I really want to flesh it out with new information about Nyobe. It’s just … Continue reading

March 19, 2014 · Leave a comment

Confronting White Privilege: Lecture — Tim Wise “Pathological Privilege”

I know this is a touchy subject for white folks like me to broach, but this is a fantastic talk. This year, I’ve been on a quest to confront my … Continue reading

March 15, 2014 · Leave a comment

Critical Analysis– Lelia Green’s “What Fuels Technology Change?”

Asking whether technology is a neutral agent in societal change naturally presupposes that technology is in itself the agent of that change. Further, asking whether it is technological or social … Continue reading

March 1, 2014 · Leave a comment

Critical Analysis– The Jesuit Relations

The Jesuit Relations, collected and edited by Allan Greer, is an anthology of Jesuit missionary reports written during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. These reports accompanied the encroachment of New … Continue reading

February 26, 2014 · 2 Comments

As it was in the Beginning, So shall it be in the End– Nicholas Carr’s The Shallows

“In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth,” the Holy Bible says, “the earth was without form, and void.”[Genesis, 1:1-2a, NKJV.]  Here, science and theology seem to agree, … Continue reading

February 19, 2014 · 1 Comment

Critical Analysis– Matthew Restall’s Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest

Matthew Restall’s sweeping and authoritative work, Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest seeks to debunk five centuries of historiographical half-truths. Quoting Armesto, he begins his work by undermining the certainty … Continue reading

February 19, 2014 · Leave a comment

Critical Analysis — Ferdinand Oyono’s Houseboy

Ferdinand Oyono begins his haunting tragedy at the end of a Cameroonian houseboy’s life. “Brother, what are we,” Toundi Onduo asks as he enjoys his last arki, only minutes before … Continue reading

February 17, 2014 · 56 Comments

Throw Back Thursday – Africans of WWII

Our History Books would tell us that the Great War and its angry step-son WWII were fought on European soil and ultimately won by heroic Americans who joined the fight … Continue reading

February 13, 2014 · Leave a comment

Throw Back Thursday — Newton

“What Des-Cartes did was a good step. You have added much several ways, & especially in taking ye colours of thin plates into philosophical consideration. If I have seen further … Continue reading

December 20, 2013 · 3 Comments

Here Goes Something

“What is a title, after all, but a concise symbol of what one hopes one has said?” What’s in a name? Would not a rose by another name smell as … Continue reading

October 25, 2013 · Leave a comment