Regarding Race, Nation, and Our Future

Written Work by Graham T. Baden

“Our White Fathers:” Patriarchy and Shifting Gender Roles in Colonial Nigeria, 1900-1961

“Our White Fathers:” Patriarchy and Shifting Gender Roles in Colonial Nigeria, 1900-1961             The twentieth-century immigration of European colonizers to Nigeria required the maintenance of a … Continue reading

January 13, 2015 · 3 Comments

Algeria’s Gender Dialectic: Tradition, Autocracy, and the Pursuit of Gender Equality in Algeria, 1954–2014

Algeria’s Gender Diaialectic: Tradition, Autocracy, and the Pursuit of Gender Equality in Algeria, 1954—2014               Algeria, a nation of social contrasts and political contradictions, stands … Continue reading

January 9, 2015 · 1 Comment

Think Back Thursday — Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti

Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti was a political activist and a champion of women’s rights in colonial and post-independence Nigeria. She was a leading force in women’s suffrage during the 1950s and she … Continue reading

November 6, 2014 · Leave a comment

Pan-African, Pan-Cameroonian: The Exceptionalism and Entanglement of Cameroon’s Independence History

    Pan-African, Pan-Cameroonian: The Exceptionalism and Entanglement of Cameroon’s Independence History   The Republic of Cameroon is known affectionately by many names. For geographic reasons, it is known in … Continue reading

June 12, 2014 · 3 Comments

Pan-African, Pan-Cameroonian: The Success, Influence, and Failure of the Union des Populations Camerounais

  Download the PDF here Hist.392.presentation.UPC

April 28, 2014 · Leave a comment

Film Analysis — The Gods Must Be Crazy

At first glance, “The Gods Must Be Crazy” is an innocent comedy, full of guiltless slapstick and overtly-prolonged gags. Billed as “an epic comedy of absurd proportions,” it has become … Continue reading

April 4, 2014 · 4 Comments

Shaping Power — The Woodworks of the Luba Peoples of Central Africa

The glorious wooden carvings of the Luba peoples hold within them an indefinable power. They held kings, recorded histories, and united nations. While it is easy to grasp why the … Continue reading

March 28, 2014 · Leave a comment

Throwback Thursday — Stephen Bantu Biko

Stephen Bantu Biko, born December 18, 1946 and murdered the 12th of September, 1977 was a champion of Pan-Africa and a hero of the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa during the … Continue reading

March 27, 2014 · Leave a comment

Presentation– Imagining a Bilingual Nation

Power Point: Imagining a Bilingual Nation PDF: Imagining a Bilingual Nation

March 21, 2014 · Leave a comment

Imagining a Bilingual Nation: A Study of Cameroon’s Independence and Reunification at its Fiftieth Anniversary

Abstract: Considering the unique position of the Cameroons, having had three colonial rulers within the 20th century, what were the political, social, and economic reasons for the unification of Anglophone … Continue reading

March 21, 2014 · 2 Comments

Ruben Um Nyobe

This man is fascinating! I wrote a paper about Cameroonian independence in 2012 (I finally uploaded it) and I really want to flesh it out with new information about Nyobe. It’s just … Continue reading

March 19, 2014 · Leave a comment

Critical Analysis– Matthew Restall’s Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest

Matthew Restall’s sweeping and authoritative work, Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest seeks to debunk five centuries of historiographical half-truths. Quoting Armesto, he begins his work by undermining the certainty … Continue reading

February 19, 2014 · Leave a comment

Critical Analysis — Ferdinand Oyono’s Houseboy

Ferdinand Oyono begins his haunting tragedy at the end of a Cameroonian houseboy’s life. “Brother, what are we,” Toundi Onduo asks as he enjoys his last arki, only minutes before … Continue reading

February 17, 2014 · 56 Comments